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Non-polar molecules

Molecules that have an equal distribution of charge are non-polar.

Molecules without fluorine, oxygen, nitrogen, or chlorine are usually non-polar.

Liquid alkanes such as pentane ($$\ce{C5H12}$$) are non-polar.

Some molecules containing the electronegative elements $$(\ce{F},\ce{O},\ce{Cl},\ce{N})$$ can be non-polar. This happens when the molecules are structurally balanced and the charge is evenly distributed.

Carbon dioxide ($$\ce{CO2}$$) is a non-polar molecule but each $$\ce{C=O}$$ bond is not. The bonds are placed such that the charge on both ends are approximately the same.

The image below shows some non-polar molecules.

From left to right, molecular structures of propane, methane, carbon dioxide and borotrifluoride are shown.
From left to right, molecular structures of propane, methane, carbon dioxide and borotrifluoride are shown.