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Heat capacity

The heat capacity ($$C$$) of an object is the amount of thermal energy required to raise its temperature by one degree Celsius (or equivalently by one kelvin).

The heat capacity is given by:$$$\Torange{\text{heat capacity}}=\frac{\Tred{\text{thermal energy}}}{\Tblue{\text{change in temperature}} } \quad \Torange{C} = \frac{\Tred{Q}}{\Tblue{\Delta T}}$$$

Heat capacity is measured in joules per degree Celsius (or kelvin): $$ \text{J} / ^{\circ} \text{C}$$ (or $$\text{J K}^{-1}$$)

A container of water absorbs $$\Tred{2000 \text{ J}}$$ of thermal energy and heats up by $$\Tblue{2^{\circ}\text{C}}.$$

The heat capacity of the water is $$\Torange{1000 \text{ J}/^{\circ}\text{C}}.$$

Objects with higher heat capacities cool and warm more slowly than objects with lower heat capacities.

The heat capacity of one litre of air is about $$ 1.3 \text{ J}/^{\circ}\text{C}.$$
The heat capacity of one litre of air is about $$ 1.3 \text{ J}/^{\circ}\text{C}.$$